Studies on self-reported driving after marijuana use have become increasingly relevant with the changing landscape of marijuana policies, including both medical and recreational legalization. Research in this area aims to understand the potential risks associated with driving under the influence of marijuana and how policy changes may influence behavior. For more information please visit Las Vegas Cannabis Reviews

One study published in JAMA Internal Medicine in 2018 analyzed data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health from 2002 to 2014. The study found that self-reported driving after marijuana use increased significantly from 2002 to 2014, particularly among those aged 26 or older. However, it’s worth noting that this study did not differentiate between medical and recreational marijuana use.

Another study published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence in 2017 focused specifically on the impact of medical marijuana laws (MMLs) on self-reported driving under the influence of marijuana. The study found that states with MMLs had higher rates of self-reported driving under the influence of marijuana compared to states without MMLs. However, the study did not find a significant increase in traffic fatalities associated with MMLs.

On the other hand, a study published in the American Journal of Public Health in 2017 examined the association between recreational marijuana laws (RMLs) and self-reported driving after marijuana use. The study found that RMLs were associated with a higher prevalence of self-reported driving after marijuana use, particularly among adults aged 21 to 25.

Overall, research suggests that there is an association between both medical and recreational marijuana policies and self-reported driving after marijuana use. However, more studies are needed to fully understand the implications of these policies on traffic safety and to develop effective strategies for mitigating the risks associated with driving under the influence of marijuana.